Inklings from the Meanest Mommy



Ask me anything  
Reblogged from babygotbatched
babygotbatched:

I’m graduating today, and I decided to decorate my cap for the occasion.

babygotbatched:

I’m graduating today, and I decided to decorate my cap for the occasion.

Reblogged from womenrockscience
womenrockscience:

Rocket Girls: A Five day series into legends of aerospace engineering

womenrockscience:

Rocket Girls: A Five day series into legends of aerospace engineering

(via themarysue)

Reblogged from handsometuesday-deactivated2014

handsometuesday:

Dr. Mary Walker ”believed that tight corsets along with voluminous skirts and petticoats were unsanitary and hampered her medical practice. So she didn’t wear them: first sporting bloomers, then, midway through the war, abandoning those for a male surgeon’s uniform. She didn’t attempt to pass as a man; she was an obviously female doctor wearing a male uniform…. She continued to wear men’s clothing throughout her long life (she lived until 1919) and continually advocated for rational dress reform for women.”

(via themarysue)

Reblogged from babygotbatched
babygotbatched:

Yorick is in a cuddly mood right now

babygotbatched:

Yorick is in a cuddly mood right now

Reblogged from cayya

cayya:

Andrew on The Late Late Show 

(via oswinoswald-soufflegirl)

Reblogged from snarkenstone

se-ren-d-ipi-ty:

lacigreen:

snarkenstone:

On the left we have the lyrics from Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines. On the right we rape survivors participating in Project Unbreakable, showing the various things that were said to them by their rapist.

From the Mouths of Rapist: The Lyrics to Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines

i think this is the most powerful photoset i’ve ever seen on tumblr.

Reblogging until you understand why this song is so vile

(via oodlycrafting)


Reblogged from sashimigrade

My 5-year-old insists that Bilbo Baggins is a girl.

The first time she made this claim, I protested. Part of the fun of reading to your kids, after all, is in sharing the stories you loved as a child. And in the story I knew, Bilbo was a boy. A boy hobbit. (Whatever that entails.)

But my daughter was determined. She liked the story pretty well so far, but Bilbo was definitely a girl. So would I please start reading the book the right way? I hesitated. I imagined Tolkien spinning in his grave. I imagined mean letters from his testy estate. I imagined the story getting as lost in gender distinctions as dwarves in the Mirkwood.

Then I thought: What the hell, it’s just a pronoun. My daughter wants Bilbo to be a girl, so a girl she will be. And you know what? The switch was easy. Bilbo, it turns out, makes a terrific heroine. She’s tough, resourceful, humble, funny, and uses her wits to make off with a spectacular piece of jewelry. Perhaps most importantly, she never makes an issue of her gender—and neither does anyone else.

Bilbo Baggins is a girl: Until children’s books catch up to our daughters, rewrite them. (via sashimigrade)

(via oodlycrafting)

Reblogged from tjthatfunnyguy